Moving to Ireland?

(Picture Via OECD.org)

(Picture Via OECD.org)

If you are thinking about moving to Ireland, or anywhere else for that matter, you might want to do some comparisons before you pack your bags.

According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development,  or OECD for short, you should only pack your bags and head for Ireland if you already have a job and will earn over $23,917 a year, as disposable income!

Does Ireland out perform the USA in healthcare, education, environment, employment, community, housing? Does life balance out against work in general?

Yes, for the most part the two countries are even, with only miniscule differences in areas such as education, America scored 0.1 higher than Ireland. Housing, America scored 0.8 higher. Environment, Ireland scored 0.1 higher. Civic engagement, Ireland scored 0.6 higher. Safety, Ireland scored 0.4 higher. And health, America scored 0.4 higher than Ireland.

The big discrepancies occur with income, life-work balance and community. Ireland leads the way with community, at 2.6 higher than the US there is a stronger sense of connection among Irish people living in Ireland. The US leads by 6.9 with Income. The US leads by 1.9 with jobs. And again the US leads by 0.5 when it comes to life satisfaction. But Ireland takes the 2.6 lead when it measures life-work balance.

There is quite a big income gap according to the OECD. “There is a considerable gap between the richest and poorest – the top 20% of the population earn almost five times as much as the bottom 20%.” That’s a significant gap!

So the long and short of it is: If you don’t mind rain, have 100% job security, and earn enough to leave you almost $24,000 to play with, then Ireland might be the place for you. I mention rain because among most Irish immigrants it is the one major deterring factor about relocating to Ireland. It sounds silly that something like the weather should be such an important factor, but Irish weather comes up a lot in conversations about Ireland.

The country is historic, scenic and the people are friendly, and well-educated. Life in Ireland could very well suit you, so long as the rain doesn’t dampen your spirits.